Текст и ответы на вопросы

Одним из заданий на чтение ЕГЭ по английскому языку является чтение отрывка из художественной литературы и выбор ответов на последующие вопросы. Здесь приводим решение заданий на чтение из открытой базы Федерального института педагогических измерений (фипи)

Задание 1 на текст и ответы на вопросы

Прочитайте отрывок из романа и выполните задания 1 – 7, выбирая букву A, B, C или D. Установите соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

текстответ

I had first become acquainted with my Italian friend by meeting him at certain great houses where he taught his own language and I taught drawing. All I then knew of the history of his life was that he had left Italy for political reasons; and that he had been for many years respectably established in London as a teacher.

Without being actually a dwarf – for he was perfectly well-proportioned from head to foot – Pesca was, I think, the smallest human being I ever saw. Remarkable anywhere, by his personal appearance, he was still further distinguished among the mankind by the eccentricity of his character. The ruling idea of Peska’s life now was to show his gratitude to the country that had given him a shelter by doing his utmost to turn himself into an Englishman. The Professor aspired to become an Englishman in his habits and amusements, as well as in his personal appearance. Finding us distinguished, as a nation, by our love of athletic exercises, the little man, devoted himself to all our English sports and pastimes, firmly persuaded that he could adopt our national amusements by an effort of will the same way as he had adopted our national gaiters and our national white hat.

I had seen him risk his limbs blindly unlike others at a fox-hunt and in a cricket field; and soon afterwards I saw him risk his life, just as blindly, in the sea at Brighton.

We had met there accidentally, and were bathing together. If we had been engaged in any exercise peculiar to my own nation I should, of course, have looked after Pesca carefully; but as foreigners are generally quite as well able to take care of themselves in the water as Englishmen, it never occurred to me that the art of swimming might merely add one more to the list of manly exercises which the Professor believed that he could learn on the spot. Soon after we had both struck out from shore, I stopped, finding my friend did not follow me, and turned round to look for him. To my horror and amazement, I saw nothing between me and the beach but two little white arms which struggled for an instant above the surface of the water, and then disappeared from view. When I dived for him, the poor little man was lying quietly at the bottom, looking smaller than I had ever seen him look before.

When he had thoroughly recovered himself, his warm Southern nature broke through all artificial English restraints in a moment. He overwhelmed me with the wildest expressions of affection and in his exaggerated Italian way declared that he should never be happy again until he rendered me some service which I might remember to the end of my days.

Little did I think then – little did I think afterwards – that the opportunity of serving me was soon to come; that he was eagerly to seize it on the instant; and that by so doing he was to turn the whole current of my existence into a new channel. Yet so it was. If I had not dived for Professor Pesca when he lay under water, I should never, perhaps, have heard even the name of the woman, who now directs the purpose of my life.

1. Peska taught
A) drawing.
B) Italian.
C) English.
D) politics.

2. Peska impressed people by being
A) well-built.
B) well-mannered.
C) strange.
D) ill-mannered.

3. Peska tried to become a true Englishman because he
A) was thankful to the country that had adopted him.
B) enjoyed Englishman’s pastimes and amusements.
C) loved the way the English did athletic exercises.
D) was fond of the eccentric fashions of the English.

4. ‘… risk his limbs blindly’ means Peska
A) didn’t look where he went.
B) was unaware of danger from others.
C) caused a problem for others.
D) acted rather thoughtlessly.

5. The author didn’t look after Peska carefully because
A) they both had been engaged in the peculiar English exercise.
B) foreigners were generally bathing not far from the shore.
C) the author was sure that Peska would learn swimming on the spot.
D) the author was sure that Peska was a very good swimmer.

6. Peska wanted to do the author some favour as
A) it was in his warm nature.
B) the author had saved his life.
C) the author was his best friend.
D) he wanted to look English.

7. Peska managed to
A) change the author’s life completely.
B) become English to the core.
C) meet a woman who later directed his life.
D) turn his existence into a new channel.

1. Peska taught
A) drawing.
B) Italian. В первом же предложении автор говорит о своем итальянском друге (my Italian friend), который преподавал свой собственный язык (taught his own language), т.е. итальянский.
C) English.
D) politics.

2. Peska impressed people by being
A) well-built.
B) well-mannered.
C) strange. Автор говорит, что его друг выделялся из всех людей эксцентричностью,т.е. необычностью, странностью, своего характера (he was still further distinguished among the mankind by the eccentricity of his character).
D) ill-mannered.

3. Peska tried to become a true Englishman because he
A) was thankful to the country that had adopted him. Автор говорит о том, что главенствующей идеей в жизни Пески было стремление выразить благодарность стране, давшей ему приют (The ruling idea of Peska’s life now was to show his gratitude to the country that had given him a shelter)
B) enjoyed Englishman’s pastimes and amusements.
C) loved the way the English did athletic exercises.
D) was fond of the eccentric fashions of the English.

4. ‘… risk his limbs blindly’ means Peska
A) didn’t look where he went.
B) was unaware of danger from others.
C) caused a problem for others.
D) acted rather thoughtlessly. Дословно фраза переводится как “слепо рисковал своими конечностями”, т.е. действовал весьма безрассудно, что могло нанести вред его телу.

5. The author didn’t look after Peska carefully because
A) they both had been engaged in the peculiar English exercise.
B) foreigners were generally bathing not far from the shore.
C) the author was sure that Peska would learn swimming on the spot.
D) the author was sure that Peska was a very good swimmer. Автор считал, что иностранцы также хорошо могут позаботиться о себе в воде, как и англичане (but as foreigners are generally quite as well able to take care of themselves in the water as Englishmen, it never occurred to me that…)

7. Peska managed to
A) change the author’s life completely. Автор был удивлен, насколько Песка сможет изменить его жизнь и пустить ее по другому направлению (he was to turn the whole current of my existence into a new channel).
B) become English to the core.
C) meet a woman who later directed his life.
D) turn his existence into a new channel.

Задание 2 на текст и ответы на вопросы

Прочитайте отрывок из романа и выполните задания 1 – 7, выбирая букву A, B, C или D. Установите соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

текстответ

A Visit Home

Amid the swarming, clattering travellers, railway staff and suitcases, I saw the thick, dark eyebrows of my brother Guy lift by approximately one millimetre in greeting as I came down the steps of the footbridge and out into the station forecourt. Guy speaks like most men in the village we come from, i.e. not at all until he has spent five minutes considering whether there are other means of communication he can use instead. His favourites are the eyebrow-raise, the shrug, and the brief tilt of his chin; if he is feeling particularly emotional, he may perform all three together. That morning, as I worked my bags through the other passengers, he kept his eyebrows raised. Standing in his work clothes, he looked rather out of place, resembling a large, solitary rusty nail in the midst of, but apart from, the crowd of people: his steel-capped boots, battered, formless jacket and heavy stubble seemed to be causing many people to give him a wide berth, diverting their path to the exit rather than heading for it directly.
‘Hello, Guy’, I said.
‘Now then,’ he replied. ‘Give me one of your bags.’
‘Thank you,’ I said, and passed him a large bag.
‘Whatever have you got in here?’ he exclaimed.
My brother is appalled by indulgences such as luggage, although his exclamations are less aggressive than resignedly bemused. With Guy, you have to understand that when he asks what on earth you’ve got in a bag, it is a way of saying, ‘Hello, how are you?’
‘It’ll be the computer that’s heavy. And there are some books,’ I explained.
‘Books,’ he said wearily, shaking his head.
‘Sorry.’
‘Doesn’t matter,’ he said. ‘It’s not that heavy.’ He yanked the bag up onto his shoulder.
‘It’s nice to see you, Guy.’
Guy raised his eyebrows and chin five millimetres, and strode off towards the car park.
I felt relieved by his distracted, unemotional expression because it was usual: since he was a small child he had gone through much of life looking as if he was pondering the answer to a complex mathematical problem. But as I caught up with him and looked at him from the side, I noticed dark half-circles below his eyes.
‘Are you all right, then?’ I said.
He raised his eyebrow again, and blew out through pursed lips. He looked as if he were trying to pop the features off his face. Then he gave me the sort of consolation smile you give people when they’ve asked a stupid question, batted his lashy black-brown eyes and shrugged.
‘You look a bit worn out,’ I said.
‘I should think I do,’ he said. ‘I’ve been doing twelve-hour days on the farm since July. Sling your bags into the back of the van then.’
This was not as straightforward as he made it sound. He used the van as a workshop, storage unit and mobile home, and so as well as the usual driving-dregs of sweet wrappers and plastic bottles, there was farm equipment of an often surprising scale – straw bales, black polythene barrels, bundles of shovels and forks, metal toolboxes which were themselves almost as large as small cars, and other tools which I did not recognise or understand. Intermingled with that were random, inexplicable household articles: sofa cushions, half a dozen plant pots and a roll of carpets.
I gingerly balanced my bags on some boxes, and then walked round the van and climbed into the front passenger seat. Guy stamped down the accelerator and we shot out of the car park. Guy looked straight ahead into the traffic, lifted his eyebrows and moved his mouth in what may or may not have been a grin. As we drove through the city, I watched his face to try to catch his expression when the half-grin lapsed, but he just lost himself in nonchalant concentration on the other cars and vans around us. For something to do, I turned on the radio and began retuning it. This caused a very loud static noise to fill the cab, and Guy to jerk round in his seat, shouting, ‘Don’t fiddle with that radio.’
I snapped it off, and looked at him again. ‘Sorry’.
‘Never mind,’ he said. ‘It only plays one station and it takes me ages to get that. There are some CDs in the glove compartment. Put one of those on instead.’
I put a CD on but as we accelerated off at the bypass roundabout the music was drowned out by the engine noise anyway.
It takes only twenty minutes to drive through the hills to our village, but that day the journey seemed to take forever. Neither of us could think of anything to say to each other so Guy pretended to concentrate on the speed of his windscreen wipers which were keeping the driving rain off the windscreen so he could see the road ahead. I, on the other hand, leant my forehead against the side window, looking out at the scenery which was so familiar to me but was actually obliterated by the horizontal rain.

1. What aspect of Guy’s personality is the writer reinforcing when he says ‘if he is feeling particularly emotional, he may perform all three together’?

A) His facial expressions are difficult to interpret.
B) His speech is always backed up by non-verbal expressions.
C) He is very controlled when expressing his feelings.
D) He can give out conflicting messages about what he is thinking.

2. What is meant by many people giving Guy ‘a wide berth’?

A) People were staring at him because of the way he looked.
B) People were getting annoyed with him because he was in their way.
C) People did not understand what he was doing there.
D) People did not feel comfortable getting too close to him.

3. How does the writer feel when Guy complains about his bag?

A) He knows he shouldn’t take the complaint seriously.
B) He thinks Guy is making an unnecessary fuss.
C) He wishes Guy had not greeted him with a complaint.
D) He is embarrassed about bringing so much luggage.

4. As they walk towards the car park, the writer realises that

A) he is not being sensitive enough about Guy’s situation.
B) there is a change in Guy’s normal behaviour.
C) Guy’s expression seems more worried than usual.
D) he had more reason to be concerned about Guy than he initially thought.

5. What does the writer exaggerate when he is describing the back of the van?

A) the combination of items
B) the size of the items
C) how old the items were
D) how many items were unnecessary

6. Guy gets annoyed in the van because

A) the radio doesn’t work properly.
B) he prefers to listen to CDs.
C) the radio made a terrible noise.
D) his brother touched the radio.

7. What does the writer say about the journey in the van?

A) He preferred to look out at the countryside rather than talk.
B) He didn’t speak to Guy because the driving conditions were difficult.
C) The fact that they travelled in silence seemed to make it longer.
D) It was much slower than usual because of the weather.

1. What aspect of Guy’s personality is the writer reinforcing when he says ‘if he is feeling particularly emotional, he may perform all three together’?

A) His facial expressions are difficult to interpret.
B) His speech is always backed up by non-verbal expressions.
C) He is very controlled when expressing his feelings. Обычно Гай никаким действиями не выражал эмоций, т.е. он был сдержан (controlled). Если он хотел выразить эмоцию, то приподнимал бровь, пожимал плечами или кивал. Если эмоция была особенно сильной – мог выполнить все три действия сразу.
D) He can give out conflicting messages about what he is thinking.

2. What is meant by many people giving Guy ‘a wide berth’?

A) People were staring at him because of the way he looked.
B) People were getting annoyed with him because he was in their way.
C) People did not understand what he was doing there.
D) People did not feel comfortable getting too close to him. Фраза give a wide berth означает “избегать кого-л.” Когда люди видели Гая, то старались обойти его, видимо, чувствуя дискомфорт при виде его.

3. How does the writer feel when Guy complains about his bag?

A) He knows he shouldn’t take the complaint seriously. Когда Гай увидел багаж брата, то небрежно спросил о том, что тот навалил туда. Однако его слова свидетельствовали не об агрессии, а, скорее, об удивлении (his exclamations are less aggressive than resignedly bemused).
B) He thinks Guy is making an unnecessary fuss.
C) He wishes Guy had not greeted him with a complaint.
D) He is embarrassed about bringing so much luggage.

4. As they walk towards the car park, the writer realises that

A) he is not being sensitive enough about Guy’s situation.
B) there is a change in Guy’s normal behaviour.
C) Guy’s expression seems more worried than usual.
D) he had more reason to be concerned about Guy than he initially thought. Направляясь на парковку, автор сначала почувствовал облегчение, так как отвлеченное и безэмоциональное поведение Гая было обычным. Но потом он заметил круги под его глазами, что насторожило его.

5. What does the writer exaggerate when he is describing the back of the van?

Здесь возможны два правильных ответа:

A) the combination of items Автора действительно поразило разнообразие всяких вещей в одном месте.
B) the size of the items Автора был также ошеломлен огромными размерами вещей.
C) how old the items were
D) how many items were unnecessary

6. Guy gets annoyed in the van because

A) the radio doesn’t work properly.
B) he prefers to listen to CDs.
C) the radio made a terrible noise.
D) his brother touched the radio. Когда автор попытался настроить радио, то Гай резко прервал его (Don’t fiddle with that radio.)

7. What does the writer say about the journey in the van?

A) He preferred to look out at the countryside rather than talk.
B) He didn’t speak to Guy because the driving conditions were difficult.
C) The fact that they travelled in silence seemed to make it longer. Автор говорит о том, что поездка до места назначения занимало обычно минут 20, но в тот день она показалась вечностью, так как братья не знали о чем говорить, поэтому ехали молча.
D) It was much slower than usual because of the weather.


… остальные задания в стадии добавления…