ЕГЭ: Задание 70 на диалог и утверждения

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений A-G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 — True), какие не соответствуют (2 — False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 — Not stated).

ЗаданиеОтвет
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A. The Armoury is situated near the Kremlin.
B. Originally the Kremlin was wooden.
C. New walls and towers of red brick were built in the 15th century.
D. The Trinity Gate leads to Red Square.
E. The monument to Minin and Pozharsky is the oldest in Moscow.
F. The monument to Alexander Pushkin is not far from the monument to Yuri Dolgoruky.
G. You can watch ballets in the Maly Theatre.

A. The Armoury is situated near the Kremlin. FALSE
B. Originally the Kremlin was wooden. TRUE
C. New walls and towers of red brick were built in the 15th century. TRUE
D. The Trinity Gate leads to Red Square. FALSE
E. The monument to Minin and Pozharsky is the oldest in Moscow. NOT STATED
F. The monument to Alexander Pushkin is not far from the monument to Yuri Dolgoruky. NOT STATED
G. You can watch ballets in the Maly Theatre. FALSE

John: Hi. Ann. I’ve got great news! My parents are going to Russia on business and they are taking me, too. So, we’ll stay in Moscow for a week!
Ann: That’s great! I have always wanted to show you my native city.
John: What would you recommend us to see, in the first place?
Ann: First of all, you should visit the Kremlin, which is very impressive. Here you can admire ancient cathedrals and churches, the Bell Tower of Ivan the Great, from which you can get a fantastic view of the Kremlin and the city. Here you can also visit the Armoury and see the Tsar Bell and the Tsar Cannon, which are good examples of the early masters’ work.
John: I know that the Kremlin was rebuilt several times, wasn’t it?
Ann: Yes, it was. Originally it was built of oak logs, and in 1367 Prince Dmitri Donskoi built a wall of white stone around the Kremlin. Only a hundred years later tsar Ivan III (the third) built new walls and towers of red brick, as we see them today.
John: And where shall we go after the Kremlin?
Ann: If you leave the Kremlin by the Trinity Gate, you will come to the Alexandrovsky Gardens. There you’ll see the eternal flame burning at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. There are always a lot of flowers in honour of the soldiers who died in World War II. From here you can easily get to Red Square, which is the heart of the city, and enjoy a wonderful view of St. Bazil’s Cathedral.
John: I think it’ll be great. Are there any famous monuments in Moscow?
Ann: Of course, there are. In Red Square you can see a monument to Minin and Pozharsky, which is one of the oldest monuments in Moscow. And if you go down Tverskaya Street, you’ll see a monument to Yuri Dolgoruky, the founder of Moscow, and a monument to Alexander Pushkin, a famous Russian poet.
John: Moscow is a city of theatre-goers and its theatres are famous all over the world. Is that so?
Ann: Exactly! And the best way to spend an enjoyable evening is to visit the Bolshoi Theatre, which is world-famous for its operas and ballets. Next to the Bolshoy Theatre there is the Academic Maly Theatre, the oldest drama theatre in Moscow. Moscow theatres are extremely popular with Muscovites.
John: Well, I see that Moscow is a very large city and it will take long to see its main sights.
Ann: Yes, indeed. I’ve told you about the main musts for the visitor. But there are a lot of other places which are no less interesting.